Every Gift Matters

How Your Passion Can Change the World

Charitable giving is on the rise in America. Despite the lingering effects of the economic downturn, Americans continue to give generously of their time, talent, and money more than $335 billion in 2013, a 4.4% increase from 2011. What’s more, the bulk of that charitable giving 72% came not from large foundations or corporations, but from individuals making small gifts. For those with passion for a cause and a generous spirit, it’s vitally important that they leverage their gift in the right way in order to have the greatest impact possible.

In her first book EVERY GIFT MATTERS, Carrie Morgridge shares inspiring stories of powerful gifts in action showing readers how to turn the act of giving into a vehicle for positive change. Drawing on 15 years of experience supporting causes that align with her passions through gifts, Morgridge demonstrates how a smart strategy, high expectations, a deep network, and hands-on personal involvement will ensure that one’s gift is compounded over time to have the biggest impact possible.

”Each person and every gift can make a difference,” writes Morgridge. ”Whoever you are, no matter how much or how little you have, your gift matters. The smallest, seemingly unimportant, donation can transform a life. And the best news is that giving transforms two lives: the one who receives and the one who gives.”

Through her role as Vice President of The Morgridge Family Foundation, Morgridge has learned what works and what doesn’t when it comes to giving. She argues that in order to ensure meaningful and lasting change, a gift must be more than simply a grant of money. The giver must assess whether the program is the right fit, work hand-in-hand with the key leaders on strategy, develop a plan for making the endeavor sustainable, and ensure that their gift can be leveraged to have a bigger impact on the community. By sharing real-life stories of how this hands-on approach to giving has transformed lives including her own Morgridge inspires others to believe that they can also make a difference in their community, no matter the size of their gift.

Thanks and regards,

Seth Simon Mwakitalu

Entrepreneurship Consultant and Lifestyle Trainer

Email: seth.mwakitalu@creativeminds.or.tz

Tel: +255 754 441325 or +255 714 051174

Skype:seth.simon.mwakitalu

Dominating Thoughts

We live in a world where information is everywhere. In short , we are in the information age. The challenge is having mixture of information to the extent that if one is not careful enough, there is a possibility of being confused with the information.

It is expected that information should be of help. Thus, the usefulness of the information will mainly depend on the person if and only if decides to be selective. Nowadays, bad news is news well circulated and in return remains destructive. It is from this point, one should decide which one to read, listen and see.

The fact is that, the kind of information one interested with will dominate his/her minds in the long run and as a results will automatically affects his/her actions.

In a conclusion – It is a well established principle of psychology that a person’s acts are always in harmony with the dominating thoughts of his or her mind. TAKE CARE.

Thanks and regards,

Seth Simon Mwakitalu

Entrepreneurship Consultant and Lifestyle Trainer

Email: seth.mwakitalu@creativeminds.or.tz

Tel: +255 754 441325 or +255 714 051174

Skype:seth.simon.mwakitalu

Responsibility is the price of greatness

Rohn: What Basketball Can Teach Us About Responsibility

‘Responsibility is the price of greatness.’ —Winston Churchill

Jim Rohn

During the years when professional basketball was just beginning to become popular, Bill Russell, who played center for the Boston Celtics, was one of the greatest players in the professional leagues. He was especially known for his rebounding and defensive skills, but like a lot of very tall centers, Russell was never much of a free-throw shooter. In fact, his free-throw percentage was quite a bit below average. But this low percentage didn’t really give a clear picture of Russell’s ability as an athlete, and in one game he gave a very convincing performance.

It was the final game of a championship series between the Celtics and the Los Angeles Lakers. With about 12 seconds left to play, the Lakers were behind by one point and the Celtics had the ball. It was obvious that the Lakers would have to foul one of the Boston players in order to get the ball back, and they chose to foul Bill Russell.

This was a perfectly logical choice because statistically, Russell was the worst free-throw shooter on the court. If he missed the shot, the Lakers would probably get the ball back, and they’d still have enough time to try to win the game. But if Russell made his first free throw, the Lakers’ chances would be seriously diminished—and if he made both shots, the game would essentially be over.

Bill Russell had a very peculiar style of shooting free throws. Today, no self-respecting basketball player anywhere in America would attempt to shoot this way. Aside from the question of whether it was an effective way to shoot a basket, it just looked too ridiculous.

Whenever he had to shoot a free throw, the 6-foot-11-inch Russell would start off holding the ball in both hands, about waist high. Then he’d squat down, and as he straightened up, he’d let go of the ball. It looked like he was trying to throw a bucket of dirt over a wall.

But regardless of how he looked, as soon as Russell was fouled, he knew the Celtics were going to win the game. He was absolutely certain of it, because in a situation like that, statistics and percentages meant nothing. There was a much more important factor at work, something that no one has yet found a way to express in numbers and decimal points. Simply put, Bill Russell was a player who wanted to take responsibility for the success or failure of his team. He had no reason for excuses, no possibility of blaming anybody else if the game was lost, no second guessing. Bill Russell wanted the ball in his own hands and nobody else’s.

Even if he’d missed every free throw he’d ever shot in his life, he knew he was going to make this one. And that is exactly what happened. That is what virtually always happens when a man or woman eagerly and confidently accepts responsibility.

I’ve always felt that accepting responsibility is one of the highest forms of human maturity. A willingness to be accountable, to put yourself on the line, is really the defining characteristic of adulthood.

Anyone who has raised children knows how true this is. Just look at a baby during the first few years of life. Every gesture, every facial expression, every tentative word has one message for the baby’s parents.

The message is: “I am totally dependent on you. I can’t do anything for myself, and even if I try, I can’t be held responsible for the consequences. After all, I’m just a baby!”

Ten or 12 years later, of course, as the boy or girl enters adolescence, the message to parents will be very different. It will sound something like this: “Why don’t you just leave me alone? I want to be totally independent. I don’t want to do anything but think about myself. I certainly don’t want to accept any responsibility for anything beyond my own well-defined needs and desires.”

It’s only when we’re at last grown up that the first two messages—“I am totally dependent on you” and “I am totally independent of you”—finally turn into “You can depend on me,” which is the truly adult outlook. Strange as it might seem, of course, there are people in their 30s and 40s who are still acting like adolescents. And there are even people in their 40s and 50s who are still acting like babies as far as their attitude toward responsibility is concerned.

These kinds of people can be hard to have around, especially if you have to work with them, but the large number of people who shirk responsibility can also provide opportunities for you. If you decide to be one of the few who embraces responsibility, you can lead and you deserve to lead.

Churchill said, “Responsibility is the price of greatness.” And in my opinion, it’s really a rather small price to pay.

Thanks and regards,

Seth Simon Mwakitalu

Entrepreneurship Consultant and Lifestyle Trainer

Email: seth.mwakitalu@creativeminds.or.tz

Tel: +255 754 441325 or +255 714 051174

Skype:seth.simon.mwakitalu